August Reading Edit

Our monthly reading edits are compiled by Francine Thompson, W&D’s Content Manager, Bridgette Dutkowski, W&D’s Project Manager, and me! Every month we get together to talk about the content going on W&D for the upcoming weeks, which is most often inspired by articles, timely topics, and cultural touch points outside the lifestyle category. We hope that we enjoy these links and get as much out of them as we do!

Popping in quickly to say hello! And, how the heck are you guys? I “head back” to work next week and I’ve been wrestling with all of the emotions as the weeks and days tick closer to the unofficial end to summer (and the very official start of our lease at new studio space. More on that to come). We have a lot of exciting things brewing but I sure have enjoyed spending most of my waking hours cuddling with a little 12 lb burrito.

Below are a couple articles that caught our eye this month. Looking forward to getting back online and making things. Talk to you soon!

+ On objectivity, personal style, and lessons learned from Bill: “Cunningham’s detachment from the elites helped him connect to the part of fashion where the real energy was contained: young people, eccentric outliers, and the denizens of the street.” Bill Cunningham Thought Every New Yorker Was Worth Photographing– by Véronique Hyland via NYMag.com

+ On how Rio plans to reuse their Olympics structures: “In a plan that Mayor Eduardo Paes calls “nomadic architecture,” some of the modular venues can be taken apart and rebuilt into schools and community centers. He was inspired by the buildings at the London Olympics, which were designed to be taken down after use, but wanted to go further.” – These Olympic Venues Are Designed To Transform Into Schools After The Games – by Adele Peters via Fast Company

+ On celebrating the small stuff: “Imagine if we celebrated all the times bad shit didn’t happen. Would we all be in a constant state of gratitude?  That fact that you’re even reading this sentence means that your computer is neither on fire nor at the bottom of the ocean. What a gift!” – How to Feel Good: 11 Small Victories Worth Celebrating – by Haley Nahmen via Man Repeller

+ On the best way to help your kids succeed (at least academically): “What if there is a simpler, less stressful way to help kids succeed? The research on self-control suggests there is: Instead of focusing directly on achievement per se, parents and educators can help children be successful by helping them practice and develop skills related to self-control.” – Helping Children Succeed– Without the Stress – by Erica Reischer via The Atlantic

+ On figuring out how to use the genes of elite athletes to treat the rest of us: ““We learn a lot of things by looking at extremes,” Ashley told me. “The fittest and the most failing in the world — the power of the genome speaks to more than one system.” This is the logic that governs his work: He’s on a quest to use the healthiest people in the world to help the least healthy, and, perhaps, those of us who fall somewhere in between.” – Superhero Genes – by Maria Konnikova via California Sunday

+ On the forgotten art of being humble: “Intellectual humility relies on the ability to prefer truth over social status. It is marked primarily by a commitment to seeking answers, and a willingness to accept new ideas – even if they contradict our views.” – Overvaluing Confidence, We’ve Forgotten the Power of Humility – by Jacob Burak via Aeon

+ On overcoming worry and finding friendliness.

And if you somehow missed President Obama’s essay on feminism, you should read it immediately. Or if you rather listen to your articles than read them, play an episode or two of 99% Invisible.

—Image via Kate Holstein