Spring Reading Edit

March was nothing short of crazy. I’ve been burning it at both ends for about six weeks, working on four product lines and jumping into consulting again with a large last-minute project that required 9 days of shooting and lots and lots of planning. I hate seeing time fly by me without stopping to enjoy the little things, but this past Friday I finally made time to get a facial, close my computer, and read a book. We have a short reading edit for you to wrap up March, but there’s a ton of great content on W&D that’s worth revisiting if you have the time. – Kate

+ On how to better with your money: “Full disclosure: I’m not a financial expert. I’m a regular human being, one who once sailed off on a work trip after whispering to her boss that she didn’t have enough cash to pay for her cab ride to the airport.” Finance Tips I Wish I’d Known When I Was 20, by Becky Lang

+ On how men can be feminists too: “I don’t want to give the world a guy that can’t iron his own shirt, and I won’t give your future wife a husband who won’t do the dishes,” she said. My Mom Raised Me a Feminist, by Joe Peters

+ On embracing your inner Beyoncé: “Whether you like her or not, you most definitely are on a first name basis with Beyoncé. There’s no denying her icon status. So, no “Women Who #Werk” March series would be complete without drawing inspiration from a woman whose hard work has captivated the top of the charts for two decades.” The Gospel According to Beyoncé, by Ashley Paguyo El Shourbagy

+ On letting go of perfectionism and enjoying life: “Embrace the journey. The mess. The delicately burnt edges. The lightly bruised fruit. The recipes that make themselves. Including the one that is life.” Goodbye Perfectionism, Hello Creativity in the Kitchen, by Amanda Paa

+ On being true to yourself when going through hard times: “But people don’t want to look at the hard things. And that goes for me, too. Angry and afraid are unattractive things to be. I don’t particularly enjoy them in other people, and I’ve spent a lifetime trying to be brave and likable.” You Do Not Have to Be Good, by Nora McInerny

+ On how to use your intuition and empathy to your advantage: “Feeling others’ emotions as your own allows for creating deeper relationships. Being able to get on someone’s wavelength immediately allows you to bond with humans almost instantaneously.” Feelings Are Fun: Your Emotional Overdrive May Be Your Superpower, by Liz Welle

+ On celebrating women: “Go in there and be a woman.” Said by my mother, as she dropped me off at the ER to go see my boyfriend, who was on the way in an ambulance having had a seizure out of nowhere.” Hey, Ladies. Thank You, by Kate Arends


+ On cool vases that look like jellyfish: The Japanese product design company Nendo has a way of hitting the perfect balance between playful design and serious dedication to materiality. In a recent profile of founding designer Oki Sato for Co.Design, he describes the feeling he hopes to evoke in his customers as an exclamation point.” Nendo’s Latest? Silicon Vases That Look And Act Like Jellyfish, by Meg Miller via Fastcodesign.com

+ On how a lot of good music is about identity: “In 2017, identity is the topic at the absolute center of our conversations about music. There may be times when this fact grates at us, when it feels as though there must be other dimensions of the world to attend to; “surely,” you moan, “there are songs that speak to basic human emotions in ways that transcend the particulars of who we are!” But if you look through the essays in this magazine, you may notice two things. One is that, unbidden and according to no plan, they find themselves continually reckoning with questions of identity. The other is that they’re doing this because the musicians are, too.” 25 Songs That Tell Us Where Music is Going by Nitsuh Abebe via the New York Times Magazine

+ On how FB is destroying the news organization: “It’s not that Mark Zuckerberg set out to dismantle the news business when he founded Facebook 13 years ago. Yet news organizations are perhaps the biggest casualty of the world Zuckerberg built. There’s reason to believe things are going to get worse.” The Mark Zuckerberg Manifesto Is a Blueprint for Destroying Journalism by Adrienne LaFrance via The Atlantic

+ A new children’s book all about celebrating women in space: “A beautifully illustrated board book for children, introducing them to all the brave, bold women of the space program’s past, present, and future.”  Launch Ladies – A Children’s Book About the Women of Space, by Jamie Erickson and Leila McNeill

+ On how you shouldn’t buy into niche marketing strategies:  “It’s easy to sound smart and provocative when you’re the underdog. It’s easier to be reckless when you have nothing to lose. It’s also easier to create a united front when you really are being persecuted or attacked—when you’re an outsider. At least all of this is harder than expressing a coherent, cogent message for an extended period of time.” I helped Create the Milo Trolling Playbook. You Should Stop Playing Right Into It, by Ryan Holiday via The Observer.

Our monthly reading edits are compiled by Stefani Ellenbecker, W&D’s Editorial Director, and me! Every month we get together to talk about the content going on W&D for the upcoming weeks, which is most often inspired by articles, timely topics, and cultural touch points outside the lifestyle category. We hope that we enjoy these links and get as much out of them as we do!