Fashion We’re Loving from Eid Celebrations

With Eid celebrations coming to a close yesterday, W&D couldn’t help but gush over the gorgeous fashions seen on women from all over the world. In this colorful recap, Ashley interviews three women to give us a sneak peek into their lives as they prepared their homes, hearts, and wardrobes for Eid. – Kate


With the end of Ramadan, Eid al-Fitr was in full swing the past few days and many Muslim women were celebrating in style. Eid al-Fitr, which means “the breaking of the fast,” is a joyous celebration that lasts three days. Traditionally, Eid is a fun time to clean up and don something extra special. So, I reached out to a few fab gals whose closets we couldn’t wait to climb into and asked, “What are you wearing this Eid?”

Fab Eid Gal: Büşra Qadir of NINDYAA

Why we think she’s rad: Büşra seems to do everything with such thoughtfulness and deliberate intention. This usually manifests itself in avant-garde color combinations and nostalgic home interior choices. Büşra and her husband apply principled, value-based living to their gorgeous home and textile company, NINDYAA.

What were you planning to wear this Eid? To be honest with you, while I love dressing up and looking my best, I never really plan my outfits in advance. For this year’s Eid, I had a few outfit options in mind. I wanted to either go for a beautiful bright orange and beige colored Shalwar Kameez, which I wore last year in Pakistan or wear my new red Kimono that a close friend recently brought me from Japan. I am probably a little unusual with my fashion sense on days like Eid. I don’t stick to a certain cultural attire, that would be boring!

As for matching accessories, I added my beloved Popinjay Iznik clutch to my look. It always looks fantastic and makes me happy!

What do you consider when selecting an Eid outfit? Trends? Comfort? Modesty? I don’t follow specific trends when selecting my outfits. I love unusual color combinations, contrasts and interesting patterns – they make me feel a thousand times. I also love finding new ways of combining my existing clothes instead of buying new Eid outfits every year. There are so many treasures in our wardrobes!

Where were you celebrating Eid? How did you celebrate? Call me crazy, but I spend Eid in different places and social set-ups every year! Last year, my husband and I celebrated with my Turkish family at my Grandma’s house in Northern Germany. The year before, we were in Lahore, which was my first Eid experience in Pakistan. I still remember every magical detail.

This year I celebrated Eid with my husband alone because our families are out of reach (laughs). We started our day with a delicious Turkish breakfast, then, jumped on WhatsApp calls with our families. In the evening, we saw some friends, had Pakistani food together, then, went out for shisha and tea.

What is your favorite Ramadan tradition? I love applying henna on my hands on the night before Eid. It instantly lifts my mood and makes me anticipate Eid like nothing else!

You take great pride in your home and it’s apparent! You and your husband own Nindyaa, a home line of ethically and sustainably sourced textiles. Are there any ways fun ways that you decorate for Eid? The day before Eid, I transform into Monica from Friends (haha) and clean up the whole apartment – I change our bed linen (NINDYAA of course!), burn delightful incense sticks and prepare small bowls of traditional sweets that I place on our table.

While many Muslim families decorate their homes with paper chains and garlands, I try to polish my home and make it look its best without adding anything new. My home interior style is on the eclectic side with many decor pieces and accessories from our home countries (Turkey, Germany, and Pakistan) but also from our trips to Bali, New York, London or Barcelona. That mix in itself is festive!


Fab Eid Gal: Nadia Azmy of NadiaAzmy.com

Why we think she’s rad: Nadia is a vivacious content creator + art director who takes bold risks in fashion and in friendship. She courted Alaa Balkhy, a longtime style inspiration of hers, and now these two women are best friends and co-founders of Mina’a Zine. Be it on her personal website or through Mina’a Zine’s quarterly publication, Nadia is constantly exploring cultural aesthetic and captivating visual stories.

What were you wearing this Eid? Something fun and festive! A beautiful peach structured Bint Thani dress.

What do you consider when selecting an Eid outfit? When I’m selecting an Eid outfit, I always look to wear something a little more festive than my usual look. Also, since we attend the Eid prayer in the morning at the mosque, I always have to make sure that my outfit is appropriate enough to be able to simply throw on a headscarf and light jacket to part take.

Where did you celebrate Eid? How did you celebrate? We had no plans I spent the weekend making new Eid traditions with my husband!

(Nadia is an NYC transplant and ended up spending the first day of Eid with other Fab Gals)

What is your favorite Ramadan tradition? Being in Egypt and listening to the call to prayer echoing all throughout the streets and visiting my family right after in the countryside.

What’s one thing you wish people understood about Islam? It’s a religion that urges you to love.

Summertime is here. Hydration is key for amazing skin, which can sometimes be a challenge when fasting. What are your favorite go-to skincare products these days? Mario Badescu Rose Water and Glossier Moisturizing Moon Mask, hands down!


Fab Eid Gal: Hoda Katebi of JooJoo Azad

Why we think she’s rad: Hoda is challenging and in a good way. She’s a political fashion blogger, photographer, and organizer who just published a book on Tehran street style. She often ponders anti-capitalist, intersectional feminist, and body-positive topics on her blog, a space that serves as “a site for unapologetic identity reclamation.”

What were you wearing this Eid? A green ruffled dress & Scapes NYC graphic jacket from In Support Of + black scarf + my mother’s old engagement watch that doesn’t work which I wear everyday (in Iran, along with giving rings when engaged, partners give each other watches. Because we gotta stay fly ya know?)

What do you consider when selecting an Eid outfit? While most Muslims gather in a mosque for Eid prayers (which I’ve done a few times and really enjoyed and even once met Lupe Fiasco after realizing he was praying right in front of me!), I was born and raised in Oklahoma where there was not a large Muslim community, and we just spent the day together as a family, playing board games and giving (read: receiving) that cash money. So, Eid (or really any Muslim or Iranian holiday) wasn’t a major celebration for me to really put a lot of thought into what I’m wearing (because usually, I’m in pajamas)!

Where were you celebrating Eid? How did you celebrate? Now that my family has moved to Michigan and myself to Chicago, we have Eid ‘mehmooni’ (essentially Farsi for ‘dinner party’) where the whole Iranian community gets together to pray and catch up, but mostly just to eat. So, because I’m not going to a mosque and therefore need to cover with long and loose clothing, I like to keep it simple, just something that is modest, comfortable, and has an elastic waist.

What is your favorite Ramadan tradition? Easily the community building. Iftars (the meal that you eat when you break fast) are always hosted all over the city by different friends, organizations, student groups, families, mosques, etc., so, trying to catch a different one every single night is such a beautiful way to share space with so many different people and have shared conversation over something we all love and appreciate: the food!

Also, for me, Ramadan is always incredibly refreshing spiritually, physically, and mentally. It’s a time where I actively and intentionally work to improve my self-control (whether that is through trying to cut my swearing or not letting things bother me), productivity, focus, and relationship to my faith, friends, and family.

What’s one thing you wish people understood about Islam? Our identities aren’t your trend, we don’t need saving, and here’s how you can be an ally.

You recently published the first-ever photography book capturing modern Iranian streetwear. What are some observations that might surprise people? Tehran street style actively challenges mainstream misconceptions about Iran and Muslims through a celebration and documentation of my people. We are artists and creatives, inspiration and influence should not go just one way. My images illustrate the beauty, variance, and multiplicity of fashion and style as it is used by Iranians living under mandatory dress codes. And yet, almost everyone in the book is breaking dress codes: I’m capturing and documenting the deviants and rebels, but all the while, showing the normalcy of illegal dressing and how not-like-you-thought-it-would-be fashion exists and thrives in Iran.

You will not see these photos on your television screens or in your textbooks!


A special thanks to these three stylish minds. They graciously allowed this curating interviewer to label them as “Muslim,” but lent an invaluable peek into their personal closets and Eid preparations – a holiday that my curiosity and desire to better understand led me to ask some pretty “basic” questions.

To follow these Fab Gals and their daily musings, fashions, and adventures, you can find them on Instagram at @busraqadir, @nadiaazmy and @hodakatebi


Image by Melissa Oholendt

Ashley Paguyo El Shourbagy is a human living in a dog’s world, as she’s the co-founder of Dogs of Instagram and peddles Hawaiian shirts for pups. Ashley shares a life with her her husband/co-founder, their happy-go-lucky baby boy, and a lapdog who constantly looks over her laptop.